The Paleoanthropology Society was founded in 1992. It recognizes that paleoanthropology is multidisciplinary in nature and the organization's central goal is to bring together physical anthropologists, archaeologists, paleontologists, geologists and a range of other researchers whose work has the potential to shed light on hominid behavioral and biological evolution.

Statement on Sexual Harassment and Assault

The Paleoanthropology Society is committed to providing a safe space, free of threats, harassment or assault, to all of our members regardless of age, ethnicity, race, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, marital status, or any other reason unrelated to professional performance. In this document, the concept of Paleoanthropology Society "member" includes both dues-paying and non-paying recipients of Society mailings.

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The Time is Now  - A message from Paleoanthropology Society Members Bill Kimbel and Kaye Reed.

News & Announcements

California Academy of Science Curator Position

Do you have a passion for cutting-edge biodiversity science, sharing it with broader audiences, and making a real-world impact?

The California Academy of Sciences seeks to fill three positions with Ph.D. scientists who do outstanding biodiversity/ecological science, focus on broader science communication & engagement, care about increasing diversity in science, are excited to connect their work to real-world sustainability outcomes, and want to change the world. This year, we are seeking candidates who work in biological or physical anthropology, herpetology, and the botany of western North America.


Olduvai Gorge Summer Field School in Tanzania

This program offers an exciting six-week study abroad experience in Tanzania at the world’s most famous archaeological site. The course emphasizes field observations, data recording and interpretation with the goal of understanding physical and biological processes of site formation and human evolution.


NSF Biological Anthropology Program Changes

The Biological Anthropology Program is returning to a six-month interval between competitions for both regular research (Senior) and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants (DDRIG).

  • For the DDRIG competition, this change is effective immediately, in conjunction with the publication of a revised solicitation (17-506). The next DDRIG target dates will be January 20, 2017, and July 20, 2017, and future dates will be January and July 20th of each year.
  • For the Senior competition (which has a program description but not a solicitation), this change will be effective AFTER the November 16, 2016 and July 19, 2017 target dates. The subsequent target dates will be January and July 20 (or next business day) of each year.


University of Wisconsin Swartkrans Field School

Experience Paleoanthropology in South Africa


Swarkrans Cave site has provided the:

  • Largest sample (> 126 individuals) of Paranthropus robustus in the world
  • First evidence for the co-existence of two different hominid lineages (Homo erectus and Paranthropus robustus)
  • First and earliest evidence for controlled use of fire found anywhere c. 1 million years ago
  • First and earliest evidence of tool use with non-stone material (i.e. bone tools) c. 1.7 million years ago

This four-week program offers you the opportunity to participate in a paleoanthropology fieldschool at the famous fossil human locality of Swartkrans, South Africa. Swartkrans, a cave site approximately twenty miles from Johannesburg, is recognized as one of the world's most important archaeological and fossil localities for the study of human evolution. The site's geological deposits span millions of years and sample several important events in human evolution.