Welcome!

The Paleoanthropology Society was founded in 1992. It recognizes that paleoanthropology is multidisciplinary in nature and the organization's central goal is to bring together physical anthropologists, archaeologists, paleontologists, geologists and a range of other researchers whose work has the potential to shed light on hominid behavioral and biological evolution.

Statement on Sexual Harassment and Assault

The Paleoanthropology Society is committed to providing a safe space, free of threats, harassment or assault, to all of our members regardless of age, ethnicity, race, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, marital status, or any other reason unrelated to professional performance. In this document, the concept of Paleoanthropology Society "member" includes both dues-paying and non-paying recipients of Society mailings.

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News & Announcements


African Origins Website

A group of researchers working in Africa has initiated the African Origins website for showcasing current research activities. It is an on-line meeting place for scientists studying African human origins and evolution, where scientists can share ideas, questions and opinions, photos, links, news, blogs, etc. The web site design is conceived so that members can promote or share information related to research activities. 


Swartkrans Field School

Experience Paleoanthropology in South Africa
(June 15 – July 15, 2016)

The Swartkrans Cave site (https://www.studyabroad.wisc.edu/programs/program.asp?program_id=246) has provided the:

  • Largest sample (> 126 individuals) of Paranthropus robustus in the world
  • First evidence for the co-existence of two different hominin lineages
    • Homo erectus (direct ancestor of modern humans)
    • Paranthropus robustus (extinct “cousin” of the genus Homo)
  • First and earliest evidence for controlled use of fire found anywhere c. 1.0 million years ago
  • First and earliest evidence of tool use with non-stone material (i.e. bone tools) c. 2.0 million years ago

This four-week program offers you the opportunity to participate in a paleoanthropology fieldschool at the famous fossil human locality of Swartkrans, South Africa (http://swartkrans.org/). Swartkrans, a cave site approximately twenty miles from Johannesburg, is recognized as one of the world's most important archaeological and fossil localities for the study of human evolution, and is part of the “Cradle of Humankind” World Heritage Site (http://www.gauteng.net/cradleofhumankind). The site's geological deposits span millions of years and sample several important events in human evolution. The oldest finds at the site date between 2.0 and 1.0 million years old-a time period during which our immediate ancestor, Homo erectus, shared the landscape with the extinct ape-man species Paranthropus robustus. In addition to fossils of these species, Swartkrans also preserves an abundant archaeological record of their behavior in the form of stone and bone tools, as well as butchered animal bones. Most spectacularly, the site contains evidence of the earliest known use of fire by human ancestors, dated to about 1.0 million years old. Younger deposits at the site sample the Middle Stone Age archaeological traces of early Homo sapiens.

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