Welcome!

The Paleoanthropology Society was founded in 1992. It recognizes that paleoanthropology is multidisciplinary in nature and the organization's central goal is to bring together physical anthropologists, archaeologists, paleontologists, geologists and a range of other researchers whose work has the potential to shed light on hominid behavioral and biological evolution.

Statement on Sexual Harassment and Assault

The Paleoanthropology Society is committed to providing a safe space, free of threats, harassment or assault, to all of our members regardless of age, ethnicity, race, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, marital status, or any other reason unrelated to professional performance. In this document, the concept of Paleoanthropology Society "member" includes both dues-paying and non-paying recipients of Society mailings.

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The Time is Now  - A message from Paleoanthropology Society Members Bill Kimbel and Kaye Reed.

News & Announcements


Univ. Indiana Olduvai Field School

The course is geared towards an introductory level and the only requirement is a beginning course in either geology, anthropology or archeology. Information about the course and pertinent contact information can be found at http://www.indiana.edu/~olduvai/.

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Obituary - Alan C. Walker

​Alan Cyril Walker (born August 23, 1938) died on November 20, 2017, of pancreatic cancer. He was a world-renowned paleoanthropologist and the recipient of numerous awards for his extraordinary scientific achievements, including a “genius” award from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and lifetime awards such as the Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, the Leighton Wilkie prize of the Center for Research into the Anthropological Foundations of Technology (CRAFT) and the Stone Age Institute, Indiana University, and the International Fondation Fyssen Prize in Paris. He was one of the only scholars in the world elected to the Royal Academy (U.K.) as well as the United States National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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University of Toronto - Assistant Professor in Evolutionary Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, invites applications for a tenure-stream position in Evolutionary Anthropology at the rank of Assistant Professor that will commence July 1, 2018.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Anthropology or a closely related discipline by July 1, 2018, or shortly thereafter, with a research focus that complements existing faculty expertise. The successful applicant must have a demonstrated record of excellence in teaching, as demonstrated by a teaching dossier that outlines past experience and accomplishments, a teaching statement that outlines teaching philosophy and plans for future teaching, and strong letters of reference. The dossier must also provide demonstrated evidence of expertise in human skeletal biology in the context of one or more of the following: evolutionary biology, developmental biology, paleoanthropology, bioarchaeology, and bone biology, as well as evidence of an active research program that contributes to one or more of these areas, and an emerging reputation in research as demonstrated by an ability to attract external research funding, publication in appropriate peer-reviewed journals with strong reputations, research in progress that targets such publication venues, and strong endorsements by referees of high international standing. Experience with indigenous community engagement, facility with crossing sub-disciplinary boundaries, and mastery over both scientific methods and ethical dimensions of research would be definite assets. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

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Swartkrans Field School 2018

University of Wisconsin Study Abroad

Experience Paleoanthropology in South Africa

Swarkrans Cave site has provided the:

  • Largest sample (> 126 individuals) of Paranthropus robustus in the world
  • First evidence for the co-existence of two different hominid lineages (Homo erectus and Paranthropus robustus)
  • First and earliest evidence for controlled use of fire found anywhere c. 1 million years ago
  • First and earliest evidence of tool use with non-stone material (i.e. bone tools) c. 1.7 million years ago
  • This four-week program offers you the opportunity to participate in a paleoanthropology fieldschool at the famous fossil human locality of Swartkrans, South Africa. Swartkrans, a cave site approximately twenty miles from Johannesburg, is recognized as one of the world's most important archaeological and fossil localities for the study of human evolution. The site's geological deposits span millions of years and sample several important events in human evolution.

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